Clinton's leads Trump in popular vote by 2.5 million


Clinton's leads Trump in popular vote by 2.5 million

"These constituents aren't supporting Mr. Trump", he said. Electors across all states will cast their votes for the next POTUS Monday, December 19.

If the number "more than 2 million" sounds familiar, by the way, it's probably because that's how many more votes Hillary Clinton won versus Donald Trump in the popular election. "I owe a debt to my children to leave them a nation they can trust", he said.

A looming recount isn't taking the pressure off either.

Trump stormed to victory with 306 electoral votes to Clinton's 232 electoral votes.

Each party selects their electoral college representatives - and because Donald Trump won the most votes in Missouri, Republican presidential electors will be the ones asking Missouri's votes for president.

Then the vote would go to Congress with the House picking Trump and Senate selecting Mike Pence for vice president.

However, it's not that simple under MI law. "I will vote for a Republican compromise candidate", he said.

"It's clearly a binding position", Cherilyn Eagar, a Utah elector, told The Salt Lake Tribune of the law in her state, dismissing efforts to get fellow electors to defect from Trump. "The will of the people is very important in this country".

The letters are from people trying to convince Hector Maldonado not to vote for Donald Trump.

"Many Electors are saying that Governor John Kasich would be best for our country".

There are 3,141 counties in the United States. I don't think any delegate who believes Trump's claims about millions of illegal votes can cast a vote in good conscience until any reasonable doubts about the election outcome have been resolved.

The close nature of the race in those states has led to recount efforts.

And the Democrats said before the election that if their side lost, they would live by the results. "It's going to be up to the courts and canvasser bodies to decide what exactly is going to happen and when it's going to happen".

Congressman Cohen continued, "When the Founders established the electoral college, it was in an era of limited nationwide communication".