Sheriff: Women saved from being pulled under cruise ship

They were pulled to safety moments before they could have been hit by a 130,000-ton cruise ship that was attempting to steer around them

They were pulled to safety moments before they could have been hit by a 130,000-ton cruise ship that was attempting to steer around them

Two women were nearly hit by a Carnival Cruise ship Saturday near the mouth of Florida's Port Canaveral harbor after flipping their jet skis and being stranded in the path of the massive ship.

As the two frantically tried to right the jet ski, the wind and current pulled them into the Port channel and in the direct path of the outgoing cruise ship.

Video posted on YouTube by a cruise ship passenger shows Primmer pulling off a daring last-second rescue, pulling both women onto his patrol boats before the cruise ship comes within feet. "Oh my god! No, get in!" are heard in the video.

After getting sight of girls, SeaPort Security Marine Deputy Taner Primmer rushed toward the women and pulled them into his boat, according to WREG.

The hazardous situation was made even more unsafe because of a nearby dredge and the wind that was pushing the women right in front of the ship's path.

While the ship's captain Doug Brown attempted to steer the ship away, he was limited in how far he could maneuver the vessel.

"If someone gets too close to one of these cruise ships when they're not supposed to, there's no way it's going to be safe", Murray said.

Skylar Penpasuglia, 19, and 20-year-old Allison Garrett of Princeton, W. Va., were frightened as their jet ski overturned in the water off Port Canaveral Saturday. Luckily Capt. Doug Brown came to the rescue and managed to get them on board his small sheriff boat before they were hit by the large cruise ship.

The channel, the sheriff's office said, happens to be rather narrow.

Seaport Security Marine Deputy Taner Primmer, who was providing security escort for the cruise ship, saw what was happening.

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