Manchester bomber was part of a network


LONDON-Britain's home secretary criticized US officials on Wednesday for leaking sensitive information about the inquiry into the extremist attack that killed 22 people at a Manchester concert arena.

According to police, Abedi, who they believe acted alone, killed 22 and injured at least 59 when he detonated an improvised bomb in the foyer of Manchester Arena, in central Manchester, where the pop star Ariana Grande was performing.

Previously, three people were arrested after warrants were executed in south Manchester, another man was arrested in Wigan, and Ismail Abedi, the bomber's brother, was arrested in Manchester. He was reportedly in the process of receiving cash transferred from Salman at the time of his arrest.

In addition, his father Ramadan Abedi and other brother Hashem Abedi were arrested in Libya.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd, who said Abedi had been known to British security officials, complained Wednesday about US officials leaking sensitive information about Abedi to the media, saying that could hinder Britain's security services and police.

"But it worries me greatly and in fact I made known my concerns about it to the United States ambassador", he said, adding: "The British police and security services need to be in the lead when this is a live investigation here".

Abedi, 22, was a British citizen born to Libyan parents and grew up around Manchester. Although the LIFG disbanded, Haroun says the father now belongs to the Salafi Jihadi movement, the most extreme sect of Salafism from which al-Qaida and the Islamic State group both hail.

Another possible link under investigation is whether Abedi had ties to Raphael Hostey, a jihadist recruiter who was killed in Syria, the officials said. It was planned for Sunday in London, but the club said it chose to call it off out of respect for the victims and in light of the security threat.

In an interview with AP from Tripoli, Ramadan Abedi said that he spoke to his 22-year old son five days ago who sounded "normal".

He said Salman was getting ready to visit Saudi Arabia for a short Umrah pilgrimage, then planned to head to Libya to spend the Islamic holy month of Ramadan with his family.

At Manchester's Didsbury Mosque, where the Abedi family worshipped, authorities condemned the bombing and denied reports that Abedi had worked there.

Britain has raised its official terror threat to "critical" - meaning it is likely an attack is imminent - and is trying to uncover a suspected extremist network before it strikes again.

They said one thread of the investigation involves pursuing whether Abedi could have been part of a larger terror cell that included Mohamed Abrini, otherwise known as "the man in the hat", with connections to the Brussels and Paris attacks.

Chelsea soccer club said it had cancelled a victory parade that had been scheduled to take place on Sunday to celebrate its Premier League title.

Officials are probing how often Abedi had traveled to Libya, which has seen an eruption of armed Islamist groups since dictator Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown and killed in 2011.

The bombing also left 64 people wounded, of whom 20 were receiving critical care for highly traumatic injuries to major organs and to limbs, a health official said.

Blood appears to show on the device used in the attack.

.