Technology


Global extortion cyberattack hits dozens of nations

Tens of thousands of computers in 99 countries have been infected in a global cyberattack. Computers were infected with what is known as "ransomware" - software that freezes up a machine and flashes a message demanding payment to release the user's data.



'Large-scale' cyberattack cripples United Kingdom hospitals

National Security Agency and later leaked to the internet. Hospitals across the country have been hit by a "ransomware" attack that froze computers, shutting wards, closing emergency rooms and bringing treatment to a halt. BoingBoing notes that this attack has echoes of another ransomware attack that targeted several hospitals in the United States in February and March 2016.


Snapchat reports first earnings since going public ; Lost $2.2 billion last quarter !

Snapchat reports first earnings since going public ; Lost $2.2 billion last quarter !

A survey of more than 3,000 people in the USA revealed consumer confidence in SnapChat was low, with 62 percent claiming they expect a SnapChat alternative to be released to which they will switch. Case in point: Facebook , and many services it owns - Instagram, WhatsApp, Messenger - now feature a Stories clone. See a trend here? "If you ask any teen how they use Snapchat , (most) say they use it to text people", Britton said.


Google implementing 3rd-party developer changes to prevent future phishing attacks

Google implementing 3rd-party developer changes to prevent future phishing attacks

This will make for a stricter web application publishing process, and while it will probably make it a little more hard to register or modify apps it will make it easier for Google to root out misleading or spoofed identities. These changes might be a bit frustrating for those developers who have no malicious intent, but should prevent future phishing scams. Developers will be able to continue testing their applications with accounts registered as an owner or editor of the project, but public ...



Ransomware cyber attack hits Telefonica, other Spanish firms

Senior officials at the "highest levels" of the U.S. government met late Friday to see what, if anything, they could do to stop the attacks and confront the potential for it to proliferate inside the U.S. A hacking group called Shadow Brokers released the malware in April claiming to have discovered the flaw from the NSA, Kaspersky said. The vulnerability was fixed by Microsoft back in March, however many systems have not yet been updated and are thus vulnerable to the attack.



Telefonica among Spanish companies hit by cyber attacks

It added that there had been no breach of data security. The committee denied the reports. But many companies and individuals haven't installed the fixes yet or are using older versions of Windows that Microsoft no longer supports and didn't fix.